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Fried Saifun, Mung Bean Threads, Cellophane Noodles, Bean Threads, Silver Noodles, Jelly Noodles, Fen Szu, Sohoon
  • Saifun noodles are known as: Mung Bean Threads, Cellophane Noodles, Bean Threads, Silver Noodles, Jelly Noodles, Fen Szu, Sohoon or Tanghoon
  • Origin and cultivation: popular in China and Southeast Asia, made out of mung bean starch
  • Availability: year-round especially in Asian groceries
  • Appearance: appear translucent white when dry, transparent if boiled and Styrofoam if fried
  • Flavor: flavorless and will absorb whatever they are served with
  • Trivia: will puff up many times their size when fried

1/2 package of saifun noodles (about 3 ounces)
2 tomatoes
1/2 teaspoon of garlic, minced
5 basil leaves, julienned
1 to 2 cups of vegetable oil
Salt and pepper

••••••••

You can deep fry the noodles a few hours in advance if you like, but you should serve immediately after mixing the noodles with the tomato mixture.

Using your hands, tear the noodles into little bundles.

Put the vegetable oil in the pan until it is 2 inches deep. Heat on medium-high because you'll want the oil to be at 375ºF. Test the oil once it seems hot by putting in a few individual pieces of saifun noodle. If it immediately puffs up in a few seconds, then the oil is hot enough. If not, try again in a minute.

Fry a golf ball sized bit of noodles at a time until they puff up and float to the top, stirring if there are bits that aren't fried. Each batch will only take a few seconds to puff. Remove and put on a paper towel. Repeat until all the noodles are fried.

Peel the tomatoes by dunking in boiling water for about 30 seconds. Then run under cold water and remove the peel. Cut in half and carefully remove the seeds. Dice the tomato.

In a small bowl, mix the tomatoes with the garlic, basil, salt and pepper.

Mix the noodles with the tomato mixture and serve immediately.

Serves 4.

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